MEMO: LCV Action Fund’s Historic Endorsements in the 2019-2020 Cycle

Courtnee Connon, 727-744-4163, courtnee_connon@lcv.org

To: Interested Parties
From: Courtnee Connon, Communications Coordinator, LCV Action Fund
Date: October 27, 2020
Re: LCV Action Fund’s Historic Endorsements in the 2019-2020 Cycle

The 2020 election is the most important election of our lifetime — our health, our environment, and our democracy are on the line. LCV Action Fund has wrapped up endorsements for this election cycle with endorsed candidates in 178 federal races, including for president, 24 for the U.S. Senate, and 153 for the U.S. House of Representatives this election cycle. Of the candidates we’ve endorsed, 40% identify as candidates of color and 52% identify as women — making this year’s endorsements our most diverse to date and more reflective of our country’s racial and gender diversity. You can find a list of all of LCV Action Fund’s endorsed candidates for the 2019-2020 cycle here.

Here are some of the LCV Action Fund-endorsed candidates who are making history:

  • If Joe Biden and Kamala Harris win she would be the first woman to serve as Vice President of the United States and the first Black person and first South Asian American
  • Hiral Tipirneni (AZ-06) would be the first Indian-American to represent Arizona in Congress.
  • Ammar Campa-Najjar (CA-50) would be the first Latino-Arab in Congress.
  • Pam Keith (FL-18) would be the first Black female veteran to be elected to Congress.
  • Rev. Raphael Warnock (GA-SEN) would be the first Black senator from Georgia.
  • Kai Kahele (HI-02) would be one of only two native Hawaiians ever to serve in the U.S. Congress since Hawaiʻi became a state.
  • Rudy Soto (ID-01) would be the first Native American and first Latino Democrat to represent Idaho in Congress.
  • Christina Hale (IN-05) would be the first Latina to represent Indiana in Congress.
  • Dr. Barbara Bollier (KS-SEN) would be the first woman physician elected to the U.S. Senate.
  • Michelle De La Isla (KS-02) would be the first Latina to represent Kansas in Congress.
  • Jon Hoadley (MI-06) would be the first openly LGBTQ Congressmember to represent Michigan.
  • If Teresa Leger Fernandez (NM-03) is elected and Deb Haaland (NM-01) and Xochitl Torres Small (NM-02) are re-elected, New Mexico would be the only state to currently have all women of color in its U.S. House delegation.
  • Nancy Goroff (NY-01) would be the first woman elected to Congress with a PhD in a scientific area.
  • Ritchie Torres (NY-15) and Mondaire Jones (NY-17) would make LGBTQ+ history as the first openly gay Black men in Congress. Torres would also be the first openly gay Afro-Latinx Member of Congress.
  • Desiree Tims (OH-10) would be both the first woman and the first Black person to represent Ohio’s 10th Congressional District. 
  • Sima Ladjevardian (TX-02) would be the the first Iranian American to serve in Congress
  • Lulu Seikaly (TX-03) would be the first Arab American woman to represent Texas in Congress.
  • Sri Kulkarni (TX-22) would be the first Indian-American to represent Texas in Congress.
  • Gina Ortiz Jones (TX-23) would be the first Filipina-American elected to Congress and the first openly lesbian person to represent Texas in Congress.
  • Candace Valenzuela (TX-24) would become the first Black Latina in Congress
  • Dr. Cameron Webb (VA-05) would be the first Black physician in Congress.
  • Tricia Zunker (WI-07) would be the first Native American to represent Wisconsin in Congress.

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Paid for by the League of Conservation Voters Action Fund, www.lcvactionfund.org, and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee

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